North Central New Jersey Edition

Post-Stroke Exercise Improves Brain Function

Physical Activity Helps Survivors

Ruslan Guzov/Shutterstock.com

Research from the University of Pittsburgh, in Pennsylvania, has established that structured physical activity following a stroke can significantly improve cognitive function in survivors. The study used data from 13 clinical trials that included 735 participants to analyze general cognitive improvement, executive function, attention and working memory, as well as the impact of different types of physical activity.

Researchers found that exercise following a stroke produced cognitive improvements in both attention and speed in processing information. They further discovered that a combination of aerobic exercise and strength training produced the maximum cognitive improvements.

“We found that a program as short as 12 weeks is effective at improving cognition, and even patients with chronic stroke can experience improvements in their cognition with an exercise intervention,” says lead author Lauren E. Oberlin, a graduate student at the university.


This article appears in the July 2017 issue of Natural Awakenings.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Eat Wheat Again

For the three in four Americans that suffer digestive distress, straightforward strategies—including eating whole wheat and grains—will rekindle normal digestive function and even restore full liver and gall bladder function.

Expect a Miracle

The miraculous enters our everyday lives when we are grateful, proactive, adventurous, generous and intuitive.

Harold Koeing on Why Science Finds Faith a Healthy Choice

People that have a strong faith enjoy better social, physical and mental health and possess a firm foundation to lean on in times of crisis, says the bestselling author.

Lutein in Greens and Eggs Slows Cognitive Aging

In a University of Illinois study, adults that ate large amounts of leafy greens, avocados and eggs had levels of lutein, a brain and eye nutrient, on par with younger people.

10 Daily Produce Servings Prevent Early Death

Yes, five servings a day of fruit and veggies is a good start, but what really prevents heart disease and cancer is 10 servings a day, a new study finds.

Add your comment: